Kicking Off, Looking Good

bob e

New member
Dec 13, 2020
2
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One of the coolest bikes ever! Remember first reading an article in a magazine about it when they were first produced in about 1984. Remember it mentioned Chris Carr was riding one then. Cycle magazine perhaps? Probably when he was still a junior. Miss the 600’s!
 

ambike

Well-known member
Dec 10, 2020
59
64
Agreed. The Wood DOHC is a rare beaut !

For a simple & stylish counterpart, try this alcohol-burning Jawa DT500.


Jawa DT 500, 11.jpg
 
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ambike

Well-known member
Dec 10, 2020
59
64
Here's a righteous Turnip TT from ' 66.

I don't know of any special race history. Limited use could be why the original headers remained in great condition ?? Most were flattened for obvious reasons.

For a number of years it belonged to Craig Vetter . It was featured in a mag article possibly in the early 1990s. Maybe CycleWorld ?

A few months into the production year, Triumph changed the VIN nomenclature from T120 C to T120 TT. This one is stamped TT.

It runs strong.


Triumph 1966 TT, Vetter.jpg

Triumph, 1966, T120-TT, 2.JPG
 
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rats

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Dec 14, 2020
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Some ostensible expert told me the 120C and 120TT were produced concurrently during one model year ('66 sounds familiar), and that the C had left-side high pipes (maybe like the T100C and TR6C?). Thanks for correcting that.

Or maybe pipes and some other, relatively minor differences were East Coast vs. West Coast models? Seems like I've heard/read quite a lot of contradictory "facts." The world is a wiggly place.
 
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ambike

Well-known member
Dec 10, 2020
59
64
The following will help clear up many questions :


As far as I know, all of the 1966 " TT " track models - whether from the first batch stamped with C , or the later production with TT - came with the signature downswept exhausts. The header pipes are 1 3/4 " diameter. The 1966 TR6SC " Desert Racer " used a pair of open, hi-mounted pipes both exiting on the left side. Those are smaller in diameter. According to the link, there were only 399 produced for the 66 year. Once again, we have another situation with the VIN coding. It's stated the " S " was dropped after 260 units were built.

Here's a genuine 1966 TR6SC with verified & matching serial numbers. It lives next to the TT. Like the TT, it also came from California.


Triumph, 1966, TR6-SC, 1.JPG

Triumph 1966 TR6SC.JPG
 
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AHRMA92

Active member
Dec 9, 2020
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Calistoga sure was a great 1/2 venue while it lasted. Great racing & a fun vacation destination for me, from San Diego County. Maybe -one day it will make comeback.
 
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ambike

Well-known member
Dec 10, 2020
59
64
Great-looking bikes !

Curious Question, M-68 Bul : Front axle has extra threads showing. An OE nut is longer, but not much. Are those legs pulled-in ? Spacers a bit narrow ?
 

NervousNovice125G

Well-known member
Dec 10, 2020
41
120
Great-looking bikes !

Curious Question, M-68 Bul : Front axle has extra threads showing. An OE nut is longer, but not much. Are those legs pulled-in ? Spacers a bit narrow ?
Good question ambike. The bike uses a lower left fork leg on the right (no tab for the brake stay), or a modified right lower fork leg. Not sure if that has anything to do with the extra axle length. I really don't think it would. Forks seem to work fine. If I remember correctly, the stock axle nut had a flange built into it, making it wider along with the washers.
 

ambike

Well-known member
Dec 10, 2020
59
64
I thought there might have been some swapping to achieve the tab-less leg. It's a clean set-up.

More often than not, OE Bultaco front axle nuts will be installed with the necked-down section facing out. The factory assembled the turned section against the lock washer. Both outer diameters match, and because the hex is not very wide, a socket will engage more securely.

Mk IV M-68s are all-time favorites. Yours can't be beat !!
 

ambike

Well-known member
Dec 10, 2020
59
64
Many fine street-trackers exist, but it's hard to beat Harley's attempt at putting an XR on the road. This one is a bone stock, low-mileage original. The motor cases proved strong ( some were not ) and the cam gears in this particular cycle are exceptionally quiet.

Harley, 1984 XR-1000.JPG

Harley, 1984 XR-1000, 2.JPG
 
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ambike

Well-known member
Dec 10, 2020
59
64
A quick series of events resulted in a new, XL-883 ( 1993 ) becoming nothing but its motor and rear hub. Everything else was destroyed.

Reason : ArmorAll and the owner's hardheaded reluctance to replace his soaked & infected tires. There's much more, but " nuff said ".

I acquired the wreck and bought everything else. Yes, including a new factory frame with original VIN.

It was a project to match-up with the genuine XRs shown here. Time frame was Summer 1994.

It's tuned, re-jetted, and with a performance ignition module runs well.

Changing the rear wheel from the factory's original 16 " with its overweight tire to the new 18 " diameter using a Sun alloy rim and R-compound Dunlop provides superior feel & balance.


Harley, 1993, XL-883, 1.JPG

Harley, 1993, XL-883, 2.JPG
 
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