Kicking Off, Looking Good

ambike

Active member
Dec 10, 2020
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I've been laying low since the Big Freeze hit Texas. I think I've finally thawed out. lol That's a story in itself and all I have to say is try standing in water up to your ankles and brooming the cascading stuff from a garage for 8 hours. That's with the temps falling into the mid-20s * F and the water icing over as it hits the driveway.

Anyway, the report here involves a long-time desire to own, or build, a TZ750 dirt tracker. I mean come 'on, who wouldn't want to have one ?

Sometime in 2015 I stumbled upon news of Yamaha TZ cases being reproduced. Original 700 & 750 racers available will often have suspect blocks with worn tolerances and repairs. Kind of adds too much worry to an expensive proposition.

I figured I'd start with a fresh block and build from there. At the same time I'd learned CMR had built a few special frames for the project I envisioned. Their rep for road race apps was solid.

Following articles showing the case patterns being produced was amazing. The company was Kelgrif out of Australia. Those guys have amazing talents. In accordance, the finished sets were going to be expensive. I figured in the least I'd end up with a unique piece of mechanical art.

Moving along, it became obvious that acquiring the many additional parts to complete a motor was not going to be feasible. OEM items were becoming too " dear ". I figured as much, but what else can a guy do ?

The market is always funny. Just when things seem few & far between, a pair of complete racers popped up. One motorcycle in particular had been reworked with a set of new factory cases which were from Yamaha's final run. The parts are sand cast using a magnesium alloy. Those are the ultimate. The reign of racing TZ750s was over but the factory ran aprox 20 + sets to satisfy the needs of sidecar racers. I do not know the exact number produced.

Long story short became why part-out the cycle which is documented as Yamaha's prototype with frame bearing serial number 001. It's restored to museum quality and the seller cringed at the thought of damaging the " hen's teeth " cases. I understood & agreed, but I wondered if he didn't trust his own work. Hmmm...,. nothing ventured, nothing gained. The solution was buying both cycles. One for Show, & one for Go. The second bike is no slouch. It's ex-Don Vesco / Gene Romero with highly credible history. Gene placed on the podium at a string of AMA Formula 750 events during 1979 at Laconia, Sears Point, and Laguna Seca. Vesco set a record at El Mirage Dry Lake running over 189 MPH.

The Bottom Line is I've left the bikes as they are. The original goal hasn't gone away, but I feel maintaining status quo is the best plan of action.

Here's a quick look :

The special motor in # 001 -

Yamaha TZ750, #001, 2.jpg

The complete bike # 001 -


Yamaha TZ750, #001, 1.jpg

The Vesco / Romero machine, TZ750D -

Yamaha TZ750-D, Romero, 4.jpg

Gene was something else ! RIP.
 
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AHRMA92

Active member
Dec 9, 2020
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Another shot of Gene on the Busch Beer / Vesco sponsored TZ, that I have on a 35mm slide. The other is a file photo of Don & his TZ in backdrop when it was on display at the San Diego Automotive Museum circa 1996. Godspeed to both, RIP.

The last I heard of the Busch TZ, was that it's in a collection near Vancouver, Canada when the owner tried to sell it on ebay & the reserve was not met, a few years ago.
 

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ambike

Active member
Dec 10, 2020
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Great photo of Don V.

That is the machine.

Wish I had the shirt !

Gene's pit board w/ # 3 was included.
 
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ambike

Active member
Dec 10, 2020
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Here's a definitive " they're only original once " Ducati 250 SCR.

It's from 1967, one owner.

These came from Ducati with rear struts in case the new owner felt the need to do any short-tracking.

The strut set contains bushings & hardware. Several extra sprockets were included. The parts remain in the factory's original wrapping.

This one had my name on it.

That shorty muffler is an add-on, but the pipe has not been cut. The seat is in perfect condition and proves the careful use.

It came out of LA, So Cal.



Ducati, 1967, SCR 250, 1.jpg


Ducati, 1967, SCR 250, 2.jpg
 
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rats

Member
Dec 14, 2020
26
10
I bet the sound is a wonderful thing.

Visually, your new bike is a fine example of that '60s "God, that's beautiful"/"What were they THINKING?!" look. Me = envious.
 

ambike

Active member
Dec 10, 2020
47
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When it comes to style and pleasing lines, the Italians are rarely found lacking.

The cycle does run as it should. Its tune is mellow, but not quite like a more cammed-up motor running a megaphone.

I'll tell you, I searched for years to find the right one. It's a pleasure to be able to show it and have others appreciate the style and function.

You have my word I'll do everything possible to keep it right.

Thank you !!